Point Reyes Lighthouse with Sixteen Thousand
Seabirds and Many Beautiful Wildflowers
****************************************
In case if you see overlapped lines of text or some lines of text become obscured behind a picture on this web
page, please change the page magnification (zoom) factor to eliminate such problems by pressing these two
keys "Ctrl +" simultaneously or these two keys "Ctrl -" simultaneously. Depending on your PC setting, it may
be necessary to reduce the magnification factor several steps down in order to eliminate the overlap and
obstructed text lines.

Please press the F11 key (Fn key and F11 key on laptop PC) on your keyboard to get full-screen view of
photos and web page. Pressing F11 key again will return to your normal screen with various tool bars.
****************************************
About Author                                 Contact Author
讀萬卷書    行萬里路

Home                                                              About Author                                               Contact Author
The Public Parking Lot for visiting Point Reyes Lighthouse is on the headland plateau level about 600 feet
above sea level and is about 0.4 miles away. After taking the 0.4 mile hiking trail from the Public Parking Lot,
visitors face this long, 308-step, stairway to hike from the headland plateau down to the Point Reyes
Lighthouse.

The Public Parking Lot for Point Reyes Lighthouse is located at: 27000 Sir Francis Drake Blvd., Inverness, CA
94937.

Map:
Click here for interactive Google Map showing location of the Public Parking Lot for Point Reyes
Lighthouse in Point Reyes National Seashore in California


Map: Click here for more detailed local map of area near Point Reyes Lighthouse
This is the gate at the starting point on the top of the 308-step long stairway to hike down to Point Reyes
Lighthouse.

It is always very windy and cold here. Visitors need to wear heavy jack to keep warm.
This picture was taken about half-way down the long stairway for a better view of the Point Reyes
Lighthouse.
The Warning Sign on gate fence on the headland plateau at the beginning of this long stairway. This is a
strenuous hike. It is equivalent to go down, then climb back up a 30-story building.
Another view of the long and steep stairway looking up from the lighthouse level.

We came to tour the Point Reyes Lighthouse area on May 4, 2018

It was quite a challenge for senior people like me at the age of 77 to go down and then climb back up this long
and steep stairway. I had to stop and rest quite a few times in order to continue to complete the strenuous
effort.

This is amazing to myself because I am in the middle of a special weight-loss program of Intermittent Fasting
by eating only one meal (lunch) per day (i.e., skipping both breakfast and dinner every day). I have been
over-weight by at least 35 pounds. My doctors told me several times to lose some weight.  I have been eating
only one meal per day for two or three weeks now. At my age of 77 and eating only one meal per day and I
can climb down and up this 30-story building and feel fine. It appears that my body has adapted well to this
Intermittent Fasting program and is able to burn the excess fat in my body to provide sufficient energy for such
strenuous effort.

Some friends told me that if they skip just one meal, they will feel headache or shaky or cold, etc.

I am lucky to be able to use the Intermittent Fasting program to lose some body weight and feel fine.

In addition to lose body weight, there are several important health benefits of doing Intermittent Fasting as
described in
here, and here.
Breathtaking views from this Observation Deck high on the top of the 600-foot cliff.
High on the headland plateau just to the right of the gate at the beginning of the long stairway down is this
fenced in Observation Deck on a high cliff.
This is a side view of the 308-step steep and long stairway looking up from the lighthouse level.
A side view of the long stairway and the lighthouse which is on a cliff and about 300 feet above sea level.
Looking down the 600-foot cliff from the Observation Deck are several big rocks with pounding waves. To
the naked eyes, the big rock closest to the green grass area below has many tiny black dots.
The headland plateau near Point Reyes Lighthouse in Point Reyes National Seashore in California is about 600
feet above sea level. But Point Reyes Lighthouse is not on the top of the 600-foot cliff. Instead, the lighthouse
is about half way down on the cliff and is about 300 feet above sea level as shown on this picture.
I used my compact super-zoom camera (Canon PowerShot SX 60 HS) with 65X optical zoom to zoom in on
this bird rock 600 feet below the Observation Deck.

Wow! Those tiny black dots become thousands and thousands of seabirds (Common Murres) nesting on this
huge bird rock.
Common Murre are seabirds that weigh about two pounds, are about the size of a football and spend most of
their life on the sea water.  But during their breeding/nesting season, from April to July, they gather in crowded
colonies on huge bird rock surfaces to nest. They lay their eggs on the bare rock ledge. Their eggs are
uniquely shaped with one end large and the other end small and pointed so that a disturbed egg rolls in a tight
circle and is unlikely to roll off the ledge and off the cliff.  About 16,000 murres nest here on this Bird Rock
near Point Reyes Lighthouse.

More information on Common Murre is available on the following Wikipedia website:

https://
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_murre
This is somewhat similar to the huge number of seabirds nesting on the huge bird rock at Yaquina Head
Outstanding Natural Area on Oregon coast as shown on my web page at:

https://
www.shltrip.com/Oregon_Tour_2016.html
Another Observation Platform at the Point Reyes Lighthouse level after visitors come down the 308-step long
stairway.
Another side of the Observation Platform at the Lighthouse level. During January and March, many visitors
come to this Observation Platform to watch migratory grey whales.
This is the sighting chart of migratory grey whales from the Observation Platform at the Lighthouse level. In
January, many grey whales are migrating south from Alaska to Baja California. In March, many grey whales
are migrating north from Baja California to Alaska.
Many pink colored wildflowers on the cliff near the 308-step stairway.
There are also many white colored wildflowers on the cliff.
A view of the Pacific Ocean, the cliff and the 308-Step stairway from the Observation Deck.
There are also many kinds of wildflowers along the 0.4-mile hiking trail between the Public Parking Lot and
the Gate at the beginning of the 308-Step Stairway.
The California poppies in the area of Point Reyes Lighthouse are yellow colored instead of orange colored that
we usually see in many other areas in California.
Several Wind-Swept cypress trees along the 0.4-mile hiking trail between the Public Parking Lot and the
Gate for the 308-Step Stairway.
Some deer among many light yellow lupine along the 0.4-mile hiking trail between the Public Parking Lot and
the Gate for 308-Step Stairway.
More deer.

On our October 2017 trip to tour Point Reyes National Seashore, we saw many elks with huge racks of
antlers in the northern part of Point Reyes National Seashore as shown on my web page at:

https://
www.shltrip.com/More_Than_400_Wild_Elks.html
A gorgeous view of the 10-Mile Beach of Point Reyes National Seashore as viewed between the wind-swept
cypress trees along the 0.4-mile hiking trail between the Public Parking Lot and the Gate for the 308-Step
Stairway.  
Red patches of wildflowers.
Light yellow colored lupine.
Lots of light yellow colored lupine.
Gorgeous wide open lush green grasslands in Point Reyes National Seashore in the spring season.
:Lots of pink colored wildflowers.
Some cows are grazing on the lush green grassland.
Lots of beautiful roadside wildflowers when we were driving on Sir Francis Drake Blvd (i.e., the main road) in
Point Reyes National Seashore on May 4, 2018.
It was a very enjoyable drive with all these lovely spring wildflowers in Point Reyes National Seashore.
Very enjoyable view! Spring is a wonderful time to visit Point Reyes National Seashore.
It is often very windy in the Point Reyes Lighthouse area, many birds are often floating in the air almost
stationary to the visitors.
Magnificent and picturesque Tunnel of giant cypress trees located at 17850 Sir Francis Drake Blvd.,
Inverness, CA 94937 in Point Reyes National Seashore.
It is important for visitors to bring powerful binoculars or powerful field scope or powerful compact super-zoom
camera to be able to see these sixteen thousand seabirds in action on the bird rock about 600 feet below the
Observation Deck on the top of the high cliff.

Naked eyes or smartphone cameras will most likely miss these seabirds entirely because these seabirds are
so far down below and appear as uninteresting tiny black dots on the rock.
These seabirds, Common Murre, are very busy flying at very high speed from the bird rock out to the ocean
to catch fish, then bring the fish back to the bird rock to feed their hungry and fast growing baby birds. Their
wings are small and short, but powerful. They use their powerful small and short wings not only for flying in
the air, but also for swimming fast under the water to catch fish. They have to flap their small and short
wings very fast and fly very fast to get enough air lift.

In July 2005, I got on a tour boat to watch millions of seabirds on and near the bird island in the Witless Bay
in eastern Newfoundland, Canada. When our tour boat got close to the bird island, there were so many
seabirds flying very fast like arrows shooting in many directions above us, near us and below us as
described on my web page at:

https://
www.shltrip.com/Birds_Islands_Newfoundland.html