Good Locations in North America to Enjoy Watching
Huge Number of Birds or Other Wildlife or Special Events
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About Author                                 Contact Author
讀萬卷書    行萬里路

Home                                                              About Author                                               Contact Author
Introduction

In last 17 years after my retirement, I have been traveling extensively in North America for sightseeing, wildlife
watching and photography.

Most national parks have spectacular views and landscapes and are well known.

But there are some locations if we get there at the right season and right time, we can see huge number
(thousands and thousands) of birds in fantastic actions, such as spectacular air show of big flock of thousands
of shorebirds doing magnificent feathery waves and ballet in the air, or many gannets diving from mid-air into
water in a feeding frenzy to catch fish, then flying back to the nearby bird island to feed their babies on the
nests, or performing dazzling aerial courtship and daredevil diving displays during aerial courtship maneuver, or
spectacular group lift-off, etc. These locations and their optimal time/season are not as well known as those of
beautiful national parks.

Based on my 17 years of experience and photography, I compiled this new web page listing the good locations
in North America and the associated optimal season and time for watching huge number of birds in action.
Each listed location has Internet links to my relevant web pages with many photos, movie clips of such
interesting bird actions, location information, maps and associated stories. I list these bird watching locations
according to the four different seasons in Section A, B, C and D respectively.

In addition to bird watching, I have also seen many interesting wildlife in my 17 years of wildlife watching trips.
The wildlife that I have seen include giant elephant seals, bull moose with huge rack of antlers, handsome elk
with big rack of 9-point antlers, caribou with huge rack of antlers, thousands of wintering Monarch butterflies,
many powerful bison, hundreds of very playful dolphins, Manatee, whale watching from shore, hundreds of
alligators sunbathing on roadside, many antelopes, Grizzly bears, big horn sheep, Musk Ox, Dall sheep,
mountain goats, horseshoe crabs, salmon, sea lions, seals, wild pigs, etc.

Therefore, I also compiled a list in Section E of good locations in North America to enjoy watching other  
wildlife in action. Each listed location has Internet links to my relevant web pages with many photos, movie
clips of such interesting wildlife actions, location information, maps and associated stories.

I also compiles a list in Section F of good location in North America to enjoy watching special events such as
spectacular air show of Blue Angel Jets over its home base in Pensacola, Florida, Hot Air Balloon Festival, and
Christmas Light Show.

Need for Good Binocular, Powerful Spotting Scope or Powerful Compact Super-
Zoom Camera to Enjoy Wildlife Watching and Photography

I hope that the good locations listed on this web page will be helpful to many people for their enjoyment of bird
watching and/or wildlife watching. However, in such wildlife watching trips, it is often important to carry a good
pair of powerful binocular or a powerful spotting scope or a powerful compact super-zoom camera, so that we
can zoom in to get close up view of the bird or other wildlife at some distance away. For example, the
compact super-zoom camera that I am using has 65X optical zoom.

There are often good reasons such that we cannot get very close to the bird or the wildlife for a close up view.
Such reasons may include (1) The wildlife, such as bear or alligator or bison, may be dangerous if we get too
close, (2) The bird or the beautiful butterfly may be scared and fly away if we get too close, or (3) There may
be obstacles such as a river, a lake or a deep canyon between the bird and us.

For example, my pictures from the famous 17-Mile Scenic Drive in Pacific Grove in California show many
interesting seabirds and many sea lions on or near the bird rocks. But some of my friends told me that they
have also toured the same 17-Mile Scenic Drive, but they did not see those seabirds or sea lions on the bird
rocks. The difference is that I was using my compact super-zoom camera with 65X optical zoom to zoom in to
get those close up views of those seabirds and sea lions on the bird rocks. But my friends did not see them
because those birds and sea lions are too far away for the naked eyes to see them well.  

The benefits of a compact super-zoom camera for tourists in sightseeing and wildlife watching trips are
described in my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Benefits_of_Compact_SuperZoom.html



A. Watching Huge Number of Birds in Summer Season

Millions and millions of seabirds usually live on ocean, spend the majority of the year on open sea far from
land. But during their breeding season from late Spring to Summer, they come on bird islands or certain
National Wildlife Refuges to nest, mate, lay eggs, incubate eggs and to raise their baby birds. Usually, these
special locations have plenty of fish in the nearby ocean to support millions of seabirds and their fast growing
babies on the bird islands and there are no predators on such offshore island to bother these seabirds. So,
late spring to summer give us special opportunities to see huge number of seabirds in action that we normally
do not see in other seasons at these special locations.

A1. Bonaventure Island in Eastern Canada with 120,000 Gannets in Summer Season

In the summer breeding season, about 120,000 Northern Gannets are flying near and nesting on the nesting
area on the Bonaventure Island which is 3.5 Km (2.2 Miles) off the coast of the village of Perce at the eastern
end of the Gaspe Peninsula in Quebec Province in eastern Canada. Gannets are large seabirds with wind
span of 6 feet.

Map:
Click here to see an interactive Google Map showing the location of Bonaventure Island

Many photos, video and associated stories are on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Bonaventure_Island_NP.html


A2. Bird Islands in Eastern Canada with Millions of Seabirds in Summer Season

In the summer breeding season, million of seabirds are busily flying in-and-out of the bird island to catch fish in
the Witless Bay to go back to feed their chicks in their nests on the bird islands in Witless Bay in Newfoundland
in eastern Canada. They include puffins, common murres, razorbills, black-legged Kittiwakes and northern
fulmars. This is my first experience to see large number of puffin in action.

Newfoundland in northeast Canada is known as the "seabird capital" of North America. Millions of sea birds
come to nest on the five bird islands in Witless Bay Ecological Reserve in Newfoundland during the summer
breeding season to lay eggs and to raise their chicks. Witless Bay is about 50 Km south of St. Johns off Route
10 in eastern Newfoundland. We got on a tour boat from Bay Bulls to tour the Witless Bay in July 2005 to see
millions of busy seabirds as shown in these pictures.


Map:
Click here to see an interactive Google Map showing location of bird islands in Witless Bay in
Newfoundland in eastern Canada

Many photos and associated stories are on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Birds_Islands_Newfoundland.html


A3 Cape St. Mary in Newfoundland, Canada has a large colony of Gannets in
Summer Season

In the summer breed season, there is a large colony of gannets nesting on the 300-foot shear cliff and sea
stack at Cape St. Mary in Newfoundland in northeastern maritime Canada to lay eggs and to raise their baby
gannets. In July 2005, we visited Cape St. Mary to watch large number of gannets in action in this area.

Map:
Click here to see interactive Google Map showing location of Cape St. Mary in Newfoundland, Canada

However, Cape St. Mary is known to be very foggy for about 200 days per year. It was indeed very foggy
when we visited Cape St. Mary's Ecological Reserve in July 2005. My foggy pictures and associated stories
are on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Crossing_Delaware_Bay.html

A4. Cap Gaspé with Many Seabirds in Gaspé Peninsula in Eastern Canada in
Summer Season

Visitors enjoy a spectacular view of the Gulf of St. Lawrence and the soaring cliffs of Cap Gaspé as viewed
from Cap Bon-Ami along the north shore of Forillon National Park.

We toured the Forillon National Park on July 7, 2011. Forillon National Park is located at the extreme northeast
end of the Gaspé peninsula facing the Gulf of St. Lawrence. It is 435 miles (700 km) northeast of Quebec City.

Map: Click here to see interactive Google Map showing location of Forillon National Park

Map: Click here for interactive Google Map showing location of Cap Bon-Ami in Forillon National Park in
Quebec, eastern Canada

By using the 35X optical zoom of my compact super-zoom camera (Canon PowerShot SX 30 IS) to zoom in,  
Wow! The quiet cliffs of Cap Gaspé comes alive with huge number of seabirds flying near those tall cliffs。

These cliffs are protected bird sanctuary. The park road on north shore ends at Cap Bon-Ami such that
Visitors are not allowed to drive closer to these cliffs of bird sanctuary near Cap Gaspé. (Many pictures taken
by regular cameras from here without super-zoom show only the quiet cliff, but do not show any bird at all.)

My photos and associated story are on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Forillon_NP.html


A5. Islands at Yaquina Head Outstanding Natural Area of Oregon Coast with Huge
Number of Seabirds in Summer Season

In summer breeding season, tens of thousands of seabirds are nesting on the bird rocks or bird islands very
close to the shore at Yaquina Head Outstanding Natural Area located at 750 NW Lighthouse Drive, Newport,
Oregon, USA 97365 • Phone: 541-574-3100.

The near-shore islands here are spring-summer home for more than 60,000 nesting seabirds (mostly Common
murres ). In other seasons, these seabirds live on the ocean and these bird rock/island will be bare. But in
summer breeding season from April to August, these seabirds pack on these islands to mate, to lay eggs, to
incubate eggs and to raise their babies. They are very busy flying out to the nearby ocean to catch fish, then
flying back to feed their babies on the nest.

My photos and associated stories are on my web page at:

http://www.shltrip.com/Oregon_Tour_2016.html


A6. Castle Rocks with Hundreds of Thousands of Seabirds near Crescent City in
Northwest California in Summer Season

In June 2016, we also saw hundreds of thousands of seabirds nesting on the off-shore Castle Rocks near
Crescent City in California as described on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Northern_California_Tour_2016.html


A7. The Bird Rocks along 17-Mile Scenic Drive in Pacific Grove with Many Seabirds

The bird rocks near the shore along the famous 17-Mile Scenic Drive in Pacific Grove, California often have
large number of seabirds as shown on my web page at:

http://www.shltrip.com/California_Coast.html


A8. Chiswell Islands in Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge with Tens of
Thousands of Seabirds in the Summer

On the morning of August 20, 2009, we took the 6-hour cruise from Seward Harbor to tour the Kenai Fjords
National Park. The tour ship has a capacity for about 150 tourists and has 2 levels. It is a high-speed
catamaran cruise ship. Wildlife is abundant throughout the Kenai Fjords National Park.

Then our tour ship came to a hot-spot where there was a feeding frenzy of concentration of very large number
of sea birds on the water surface. It was an indication of a large group of small fish (bait fish, most likely
herring) in the water and near the water surface such that those sea birds could catch those small fish easily.
There probably were some large predators under the water chasing and driving the large group of small fish to
the water surface.

Many small fish were jumping and making circular ripples on the water surface. I pointed my camera down into
the water. One could see some small fish in the water and the white color area on the lower left corner might
be the pectoral flipper (fin) of a humpback whale in the water chasing the school of small fish.

Then suddenly those sea birds in feeding frenzy on the water surface took off into the air indicating that
something big was happening under the water and near the surface to scare those birds to get off from the
water surface into the air.

Suddenly, a huge whale jumped out (breaching) of the water to the right of our ship. Then the whale came
down with a big splash.

Later on our ship came near two tall bird islands (probably Chiswell Islands in the Alaska Maritime
National Wildlife Refuge) where the whole sky is filled with huge number of seabirds busily flying and swirling in
and out of the bird islands. During the summer breeding season, tens of thousands of sea birds come here to
lay eggs and to raise their chicks on the bird islands. Abundance of fish in nearby water provides the
necessary food source for these sea birds and their chicks. I was very happy to see large number of puffin in
action here.

Map:
Click here to see interactive Google Map showing location of Chiswell Islands in Kenai Fjords National
Park

Photos and associated stories are on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Go_To_See_Alaska_Part_7_Kenai.html

A9. Kilauea Point National Wildlife Refuge in Hawaii with Huge Number of Seabirds
in Summer

In the summer breeding season, huge number of seabirds, such as red tailed Tropicbirds, Laysan Albatrosses,
Red-footed Boobies, Brown Boobies, Great Frigatebirds, and Wedge-tailed Shearwaters etc., are flying or
nesting at picturesque Kilauea Point National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) on the north shore of the Island of Kauai in
Hawaii.

Kilauea Point NWR is located at the end of Kilauea Lighthouse Road, one mile north of Kilauea, Kilauea, Kauai,
Hawaii, 96754.

Map:
Click here for interactive Google Map showing location of Kilauea Point NWR

It is a paradise for bird watchers to see thousands of seabirds flying in the sky and thousands of seabirds
nesting on the trees, bushes and on the grounds under bushes at Kilauea Point NWR.

Photos and associated stories are on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Hawaii_Part_5_Kauai.html

A10. Cape Bonavista in Newfoundland in Eastern Canada with a Colony of Puffin in
Summer

A colony of puffins on the bird rock near the Bonavista Lighthouse at the northern tip of Cape Bonavista in
Newfoundland in eastern Canada. These puffins spend most of the daytime on the sea to catch and to eat fish.
They come back at about 8 PM to feed their chicks in the nests inside the burrows.

Map:
Click here for interactive Google Map showing location of Bonavista Lighthouse and nearby bird rocks

Photos and associated stories are on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Birds_Islands_Newfoundland.html


A11. Giant Condor   

As a bird watcher, I was very excited to see a giant condor in flight over the Grand Canyon in Arizona in 2014
when I was on the Rim Trail near Lookout Studio between El Tover Lodge and Bright Angel Lodge as shown
on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Grand_Canyon_South_Rim.html

With the wing span from 9.5 to 11.4 feet, the giant condor is the largest flying land bird in America.

In 2010, I saw several condors perching on the ledges on the high cliff of the Marble Canyon which is the
eastern end of Grand Canyon as shown on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Grand_Canyon.html


A12. Egret

We saw large number of egrets at Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge in Delaware as shown on my web
pages at:

http://
shltrip.com/Summer_in_Bombay_Hook.html



B. Watching Huge Number of Birds in Winter Season

In winter season, millions of migratory birds left the frozen northern Canada and Alaska and migrates south to
warmer areas with open water. Therefore, winter season offers us special opportunities to enjoy watching
huge number of colorful migratory birds in southern parts of North America that we normally do not see in other
seasons, such as tens of thousands of snow geese, sand hill cranes, beautiful Harlequin ducks, hooded
mergansers, loons, gannets, mallards, Brandt, bald eagles, etc..


B1. Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Prime Hook NWR and Bowers
Beach in Delaware with about 100,000 Snow Geese in Winter Season

In the winter season, about 100,000 snow geese come to winter in Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge
(NWR)  and in Prime Hook NWR in Delaware.
Bombay Hook NWR is located at 2591 Whitehall Neck Rd,
Smyrna, Delaware 19977. Prime Hook NWR is located at 11978 Turkle Pond Rd, Milton, Delaware 19968.

In the day time, many of these snow geese fly out to and are scattered in various nearby farm fields to feed.
We may not know which farm field(s) they go to in the day time.

Usually the best time of the day to see huge number of snow geese in action is near the sunset time to see the
spectacular fly-in of wave after wave of huge number of snow geese flying back from farm fields to converge
into their evening roosting pond. It is fantastic to see 50,000 to 100,000 snow geese concentrated on their
roosting pond in the evening. The large body of water (of the pond or the lake or the reservoir) provides good
protection against predators so that snow geese can sleep safely on the pond at night.

Photos and associated stories on Bombay Hook NWR are on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Bombay_Hook.html

Movie of 200,000 snow geese in action in Prime Hook NWR in Delaware can be seen at the following YouTube
website:

https://
www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eph36tQkGpk

Movie of huge number of snow geese in action on Bowers Beach and on farm fields at Lewes in Delaware can
be seen at the following YouTube websites:

https://
www.youtube.com/watch?v=7aH8ua44GWc

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EwxYhOIqiBY


B2. Hundreds of Bald Eagles at Conowingo Dam in Maryland and at The Lock and
Dam on Illinois Waterway

B2A. Maryland

In the winter season, lakes and rivers in northern Canada and Alaska are frozen such that bald eagles cannot
catch fish on those frozen lakes and rivers. Therefore, many bald eagles migrate south to look for open water
where they can catch fish to eat. In the winter season, as many as 100 bald eagles and 20,000 other fishing
birds have been seen at the Conowingo Dam on Susquehanna River in northern Maryland busily catching fish.

The two important reasons that these bald eagles and 20,000 fishing birds come here in the winter season are
(1) After coming down through the large hydroelectric turbines in the Conowingo Dam, the water rush out from
under the dam creating powerful turbulent water near the base of dam. The powerful turbulent water from the
dam prevents the water from freezing up in the winter so that many fish remain accessible by these fishing
birds in the winter in this area, and
(2) Many fish coming through the hydroelectric turbines and the powerful turbulent water are stunned by such
powerful turbulence. The powerful turbulence flushes the stunned or injured fish to the water surface such that
those fish become easy targets for these fishing birds to catch.

However, the release of water from Conowingo Dam is intermittent, not continuous all the time. When the
water is not rushing out from the base of the dam, many fishing birds are standing on the rocks, or perching on
the trees or on the steel tower waiting for action. Many bird watchers are also waiting. Everything is quiet here
during such waiting periods that may last 2 or 3 hours. There are also some anglers fishing on the river bank
here. For safety reason, the dam administrator will sound the alarm siren and have several red lights in this
area flashing twice before it starts to release the powerful and turbulent water. When this happens, everything
here come alive, all those bald eagles and more than 20,000 fishing birds take to the air for action to catch
fish. Therefore, it is worthwhile to stay in this area long enough to see such fantastic actions with huge number
of fishing birds in the air and diving down to the water surface to catch fish.

Although a few "resident" bald eagles may be here all year around, the best period to see large number of
"migratory" bald eagles near this dam is the one month period from Thanksgiving to Christmas.  Photos,
associated stories and more information such as location and parking lot are on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Bald_Eagle_P_2.html

B2B. Illinois

The Lock and Dam on Illinois Waterway near the Starved Rock State Park and Illinois Waterway Visitor
Center is the key reason for many bald eagles to be in this area in the winter to catch fish
on the Illinois River. In the deep winter, most of river surface is frozen making it inaccessible to bald eagles to
catch fish. But the water flow from the top to the bottom of the Lock and Dam creates a limited area of open
water at the bottom of the Lock and Dam making it accessible to bald eagle to catch fish. Some fish stunned
by the turbulent water dropping from the top to the bottom of the Lock and Dam may become easy targets for
fishing birds like bald eagle. Therefore, in the deep winter, large number of bald eagles are forced to converge
into such limited area of open water for fishing. It is, therefore, an idea location for watching many eagles in
action.

The Eagle Viewing Festival in the area of Starved Rock Lock and Dam is usually in the deep winter of January
and February. A picture of large number of bald eagles perching on a large tree near the bottom of Starved
Rock Lock and Dam can be seen on these websites:

https://
www.pinterest.com/pin/41869471511815252/

https://www.pinterest.com/ssemkin/travel-starved-rock-state-park-il/?lp=true

Most of the bald eagles seen wintering along the Illinois River come from up North, in such areas as
Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, and Canada. They will start their journey back to their breeding grounds by
mid-March and return once again to the Illinois River Valley by late October to early November.

My photos of bald eagles in the winter at Starved Rock Lock and Dam are on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Sand_Hill_Cranes_in_Indiana.html

B2C. Bald Eagles at Many Other Locations

We also have also seen the majestic bald eagles, the masters of the sky, in action at many other locations,
including Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge in Delaware, Eastern Neck Island National Wildlife Refuge in
Maryland, Florida, Alaska, Newman Sound in Terra Nova National Park in Newfoundland and Cape Brenton
National Park in Nova Scotia in Canada, Manasquan Reservoir and Merrill Creek Reservoir in New Jersey,
Viera Wetlands (Ritch Grissom Memorial Wetlands at Viera) in Florida, Old Woman Creek State Nature
Preserve in northern Ohio, Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming, as shown in the following web pages:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Bald_Eagle.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Go_To_See_Alaska_Part_6_Wrangell.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Go_To_See_Alaska_Part_9_Ketchikan.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Go_To_See_Alaska_Part_10_Kenai_peninsula.html

http://shltrip.com/More_on_Flowers_and_Bird_Watching_in_NJ_Page_2.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Florida_Merritt_Island.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Merrill_Creek_Reservoir.html

http://shltrip.com/Heron_Rookery_in_Ohio.html

http://shltrip.com/Yellowstone_NP_Part_2.html

http://shltrip.com/Florida_Paynes_Prairie.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Toour_of_Virginia_Part_2.html

http://shltrip.com/Shore_Areas_of_Belmar.html

http://shltrip.com/Go_To_See_Alaska_Part_1_Glacier_Bay.html

http://shltrip.com/Salmons_on_Vancouver_Island.html

http://shltrip.com/Canadian_Rockies_5.html


B3. Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge in New Mexico with about 18,000
Sandhill Cranes in Winter

The Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in central New Mexico is the wintering ground of
18,000 sand hill cranes. It is amazing to see so many big birds with wing span up to 7 feet concentrated
in this NWR in the winter season as described on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Bosque_Del_Apache.html

B4. Anahuac National Wildlife Refuge along Texas Gulf Coast with Huge Number of
Snow Geese in Winter

Anahuac NWR is the wintering ground of tens of thousands of snow geese, It is along Texas Gulf Coast and
about 70 miles east of Houston. Photos, video and associated stories are on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Huge_Number_of_Birds_on_Texas_Gulf_Coast.html


B5. Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge in southern California has many Snow Geese,
Pelicans and other Birds in Winter

There are many snow geese, pelicans and other winter birds in Salton Sea NWR in southern California in
winter season as described on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Salton_Sea.html

The Salton Sea International Bird Festival usually takes place in the second week in February.

B6. Sacramento Valley in California is the Wintering Ground for Millions of
Waterfowl

Millions of waterfowl, including snow geese, swans, ducks, sandhill cranes, etc., are wintering on the flooded
post-harvest rice fields in Sacramento Valley and in Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta in California Central Valley
as described on my web pages at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Thousands_of_Swan_in_Caloifornia_Central_Valley.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Winter_Birding_in_Caloifornia_Central_Valley.html

B7. California Central Valley is the Wintering Ground for Huge Number of Sandhill
Cranes and Ducks

At sunset time in the winter season, many groups of red crowned greater sandhill cranes (丹頂沙丘鶴) are
flying in from various directions to roost on the shallow water at Isenberg Crane Reserve (i.e., Woodbridge
Ecological Reserve) near Lodi in California Central Valley as their wintering location. Photos and associated
stories are on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Sand_Hill_Cranes_and_Monarch_Butterflies_in_California.html

We also saw many sandhill cranes at Attwater Prairie-Chicken National Wildlife Refuge in Texas as shown on
my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/More_on_Winter_Birding_Along_Gulf_Coast.html


B8. San Francisco Bayshore has Huge Number of Shorebirds, and Other Fishing
Birds in Winter

In winter season, huge number of shorebirds are flying above and feeding on the mud flats at low tide periods.
Many pelicans, terns, egrets and cormorants are also busily catching fish on the lakes near the Bay or one the
Bay directly. Photos and associated stories are on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Winter_in_San_Francisco_Bay_Area.html

B9. Many Majestic Red Crowned White Cranes (Whooping Crane, 丹頂白鶴)in
Texas Coast in Winter

The whooping crane is the tallest North American bird, stands up to 5 feet and have a wing span of 7.5 feet.
An adult whooping crane is white with a red crown and a long, dark, pointed bill. Whooping cranes are
migratory birds and undertake a spectacular migration of over 3,000 miles between their summer breeding
ground in Wood Buffalo National Park, Canada and their wintering areas in the Aransas National Wildlife
Refuge (NWR) and nearby areas a few miles north of Rockport on the Texas Gulf Coast.

Photos and associated stories are on my web page at:

http://www.shltrip.com/Red_Crowned_White_Cranes.html

B10. Many Beautiful Roseate Spoonbills (玫瑰紅琵鷺)in Port Aransas, Texas and
Florida

Many beautiful flaming pink colored Roseate Spoonbills can be seen at Leonabelle Turnbull Birding Center
(also known as Port Aransas Birding Center) located at south end of Ross Avenue, Port Aransas, Texas,
Phone: (361) 749-4158. It is home to numerous species of birds, including many roseate spoonbills.

Photos and associated stories are on my web page at:

http://www.shltrip.com/Many_Beautiful_Roseate_Spoonbills.html

We have also seen the pink colored Roseate Spoonbills in Anahuac NWR in Texas as shown on my web page
at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Huge_Number_of_Birds_on_Texas_Gulf_Coast.html

We have also seen the pink colored Roseate Spoonbills in Florida as shown on my web pages at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Florida_Myakka.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Southern_Florida.html


B11. Seagulls

We got on Galveston-Bolivar Ferry to watch feeding frenzy of large number of seagulls swarming the ferry as
shown on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Huge_Number_of_Birds_on_Texas_Gulf_Coast.html

We also saw many seagulls in New Jersey, Maryland and in Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge in southern
California as shown on my web pages at:

http://
shltrip.com/Raritan_Bay_Waterfront.html

http://shltrip.com/Spring_Bird_Watching_along_Delaware_Bay.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Bald_Eagle_P_2.html

http://shltrip.com/Salton_Sea.html


B12. Sandy Hook Bay in New Jersey with Massive Long Raft of Thousands of
Thousands of Seabirds in Winter

In winter season, thousands and thousands of seabirds floating on the calm Sandy Hook Bay in New Jersey as
shown on the picture on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Winter_at_Sandy_Hook.html

It is called massive raft of seabirds that extends beyond both to the left side and the right side of this picture
for very long distance on the Sandy Hook Bay.

B13. Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge in New Jersey with Huge Number of
Birds in Winter

Large number of Brant (geese), snow geese, swans, shorebirds, pintails, canvasbacks, redheads, etc. are in
Edwin B. Forsythe NWR in New Jersey. Photos and associated stories are on my web pages at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Forsythe_Brigantine_NWF.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Forsythe_Brigantine_Part_2.html

B14. Barnegat Light Inlet in New Jersey has many Beautiful Harlequin Duck in Winter

Every winter, a group of beautiful and colorful Harlequin ducks migrates south from eastern Canada to
Barnegat Light Inlet in New Jersey. Many other colorful waterfowl also show up in Barnegat Light area in the
winter season.

Photos and more information are on my web pages at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Harlequin_Ducks.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Water_Fowl_in_Barnegat.html

B15. Shrimp Boat Surrounded by Big Swarm of Seabirds near St. Johns River Ferry
in Florida

We were driving on scenic Heckscher Drive (i.e., Route 105 or Route A1A) along the St. Johns River near
Clapboard Creek near Jackson in Florida. We were happily surprised to see a huge swarm of seabirds
surrounding and chasing shrimp boats as the shrimp boats were coming in from Atlantic Ocean into the St.
Johns River near St. Johns River Ferry and Jacksonville in northeast Florida.

Photos, video and associated stories are on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Florida_Mayport.html


B16. Beautiful Mandarin Ducks (鴛鴦)

We saw very beautiful and colorful Mandarin ducks in Palo Alto Junior Museum and Zoo located at 1451
Middlefield Rd, Palo Alto, California 94301 on November 27, 2016 as shown on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Mandarin_Duck_in_Palo_Alto.html

Winter and spring seasons are the best seasons to see Mandarin ducks because the male Mandarin
ducks are in their most spectacular breeding courtship plumage to attract females. It is fascinating to
watch them. In summer and fall seasons, the Mandarin ducks are not so colorful.

Previously, I have also seen Mandarin ducks in the zoos in Honolulu, Hawaii, in Philadelphia and in Houston. But
they are not as impressive because either in the wrong season of summer or they are in a cage.


B17. Ibis

We saw many ibises along Texas Gulf Coast, in Florida, and in Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge in southern
California as shown on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Huge_Number_of_Birds_on_Texas_Gulf_Coast.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Florida_Merritt_Island.html

http://shltrip.com/Salton_Sea.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Florida_Homosassa.html

http://shltrip.com/Southern_Florida.html


B18. Pelican

I enjoyed watching pelicans diving from mid-air down into the water to catch fish as shown on my movie clip
from Shoreline Lake in the heart of Silicon Valley near Office Building Complex of Google in Mountain View,
California at:

https://
www.youtube.com/watch?v=7b2Qkvtx48Y&feature=youtu.be

I also enjoyed watching pelicans diving from mid-air down into water catching fish on the bay near Crescent
City Harbor in northwest California and on Lake Okeechobee in Florida as shown on my web pages at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Birding-1.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Florida_Merritt_Island.html

We also saw many pelicans at Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge in southern California, in Cape Arago,
Oregon, in Redondo Beach Pier, Los Angeles, California, and in Santa Cruz, California as shown on my web
pages at:

http://
shltrip.com/Salton_Sea.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Birding-1.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Los_Angeles.html

http://shltrip.com/California_Coast.html


B19. Flamingo

We saw many flamingos in Parrot Jungle in Miami, Florida and  in Texas  as shown on my web pages at:

http://
shltrip.com/Southern_Florida.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Florida_Homosassa.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Many_Interesting_Birds_in_and_near_Duck_Lake_in_Houston_Zoo.html


C. Watching Huge Number of Birds in Spring Season

In the late winter and early spring, millions of migratory birds begin to migrate north to their spring-summer
breeding ground in arctic tundra. In such long distance migration flight, they usually make one or more re-
fueling stops at certain favored special locations for one or two weeks before they continue the long flight to
the arctic tundra. These special locations of refueling stops are excellent locations to see high concentration of
huge number of such migratory birds.

C1. Middle Creek Wildlife Management Area (WMA) in southeast Pennsylvania As a
Re-Fueling Stop of Huge Number of Snow Geese in Early Spring

On March 10, 2011, We called the phone number (717) 733-1512 of the visitor center of Middle Creek WMA
to make sure those huge number of migratory snow geese have arrived and were in that Middle Creek WMA
before we took the 2-hour drive from New Jersey to come to this WMA on March 11, 2011. We were told that
the best time to see the huge number of snow geese is at sunrise time or sunset time.

At sunset time on March 11, 2011, wave after wave of huge number of snow geese flew from nearby
agriculture fields to the 400-acre Middle Creek Lake as their evening roosting place in Middle Creek
Wildlife Management Area (WMA) near Lancaster in southeast Pennsylvania, USA . The sunset time is
about 5:30 PM or later on March 11.

The street address for the Visitor Center of Middle Creek WMA is:

100 Museum Road, Stevens (or Kleinfeltersville), PA 17578.
Phone: (717) 733-1512

Photos, video and associated stories are on my web page at:

http://www.shltrip.com/Snow_Geese_50000_of_Them_All_Over_the_Sky.html

C2. Merrill Creek Reservoir in Western New Jersey in Early Spring as Refueling Stop
for Huge Number of Snow Geese

Merrill Creek Reservoir in western New Jersey (about 50,000 Snow Geese):

In early spring, about 50,000 snow geese and thousands of swans show up in Merrill Creek reservoir in
Harmony in western New Jersey for about two-week period. This period may be last week of February and
the first week of March, but this two-week period may vary from year to year depending on how long is the
cold and frozen winter.

Photos, movie clips and detailed information are on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Merrill_Creek_Reservoir.html

This reservoir area is NOT the winter ground for the snow geese. In other words, the snow geese do not stay
at this reservoir area for the entire winter season. This reservoir area is just a resting and re-fueling stop area
for the snow geese on their spring migration north. They stop at this reservoir area for about two weeks in
early spring.

The phone number of visitor center of Merrill Creek Reservoir is (908) 454-1213. It is important that you call
the visitor center to make sure that huge number of snow geese have arrived and are at this reservoir before
you start your long drive to come to this reservoir to watch the snow geese.

During the day time, many of these snow geese may leave the reservoir and go foraging for waste grains
on some nearby farm fields. Usually the best time of the day to see huge number of snow geese in action is
near the sunset time to see the spectacular fly-in of wave after wave of huge number of snow geese flying
back from farm fields and converging into their evening roosting large reservoir or large lake. For
important safety reason, they roost at night floating in the middle of a large lake to avoid being attacked by
predators while they are sleeping.

C3. Jasper-Pulaski Fish and Wildlife Area in Indiana in Spring Season is a Refueling
Stop for Greater Sandhill Cranes

Many migratory greater sandhill cranes with wing span of 7 feet may show up in Jasper-Pulaski Fish and
Wildlife Area in Indiana in early spring as a resting and re-fueling stop over area in their spring migration north
as shown on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Sand_Hill_Cranes_in_Indiana.html

C4. Cuyahoga Valley National Park in Ohio in Spring has hundreds of Great Blue
Herons in Action

Cuyahoga Valley National Park in Ohio has two big heron rookeries with hundreds of nesting great blue herons
in action in early spring as shown on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Heron_Rookery_in_Ohio.html

C5. Delaware Bay between Delaware and New Jersey in Spring has many Gannets
following the Ferry to Catch Fish

In late March and early April, many large sea birds, gannets, begin to migrate north along American east coast
towards their summer breeding grounds in eastern Canada.

The sun in the early spring warms the water in the Delaware Bay, and the sun thaws out the mud and soil in
wetlands. Additionally, spring rains discharge nutrients and food into the water in the bay. All this activity helps
to create vast populations of plankton in the water in the bay, which in turn helps to feed many small fish, such
as herring. Plankton rich food in the bay, along with warmer water temperatures, attract large schools of fish,
such as Alewife, Blueback Herring and Shad in Atlantic ocean, to enter into Delaware Bay and Sandy Hook
Bay. For the several weeks in early spring, these fish have been waiting patiently off the coast of New Jersey
for just the right conditions to enter these bays, feed, and then head upstream to freshwater portions
of the Delaware River, Raritan River, and Navesink rivers to spawn.

These large schools of fish attract many migrating gannets to enter the bay in pursuit of herring, mackerel,
menhaden, squid, and other prey. Many of these gannets are following the wakes of Cape May-Lewes
Ferry to catch fish. Therefore, the ferry crossing the Delaware Bay in the last week of March and the first
week of April provides excellent opportunities for bird watchers to get close-up views of many gannets in
action without the need for powerful telescopes.

Photos, movie clips and detailed information are on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Crossing_Delaware_Bay.html


C6. Delaware Bay between Delaware and New Jersey in Late Spring has many  
Horseshoe Crabs, Shorebirds and Seagulls in Action on Beach

Between about mid May to the first week of June every year, huge number of horseshoe crabs come up on
the beaches along Delaware Bay (between Delaware and New Jersey, USA) to mate and to lay eggs under
the sand.

Millions of migratory shorebirds have been migrating between southern tip of Argentina and the arctic tundra
breeding ground in Alaska during change of Season. The Delaware Bay (including southern seashore of New
Jersey) is one of the  important re-fueling stops of these millions of migratory shorebirds in their long-distance
migratory flight.

After 4-day nonstop long distance flight from South America, the migratory shorebirds lost a lot of body
weight and are starving when they arrive at Delaware Bay. These migratory shorebirds stop in the Delaware
Bay to eat a lot of eggs of horseshoe crabs to double their body weights in about two weeks for two
important reasons: (1) for their next nonstop long-distance flight from Delaware Bay to Alaska, and (2) They
must breed immediately upon their arrival at arctic tundra breeding ground in Alaska so that their baby birds
will have enough time to grow up and be ready for the long-distance migratory flight south before the severe
arctic winter sets in. While at Delaware Bay, these shorebirds eat about 9,000 horseshoe crab eggs per bird
per day.

The spring mating of large number of horseshoe crabs on the beaches in Delaware Bay and the associated
spring migration of millions of shorebirds through Delaware Bay is one of the world’s most magnificent wildlife
spectacles. The Bays’ beaches are essential spawning habitat for the world’s largest concentration of
horseshoe crabs. The beaches also attract the Western Hemisphere’s second-largest spring concentration of
shorebirds, which feed on the eggs of horseshoe crabs as shown in the following YouTube website:

https://
www.youtube.com/watch?v=wWb3ma3xaBE

The huge number of horseshoe crab eggs also attracts many laughing gulls to converge along the Reeds
Beach in New Jersey and the Pickering Beach on Delaware side competing for the annual feast on the eggs of
horseshoe crabs. These gulls are called “laughing gulls” because they make a lot of very loud noises that
sound like they are laughing very loudly. These laughing gulls are especially noisy on such beaches because
they are fighting against each other for the prime real estate on the beach front so that they can feast on the
horseshoe crab eggs.

Photos, video clips and associated stories are on my web pages at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Horseshoe_Crab.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Spring_Bird_Watching_along_Delaware_Bay.html


C7. Tern

We saw many terns flying and nesting on the protected beach area of Belmar just south of Shark River Inlet in
New Jersey, diving from mid-air down into water to catch fish in Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge,
Sandy Hook Bay, and Meadowlands Richard W. Dekorte Park in New Jersey  in the spring season as shown
on my web pages at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Lots_of_Birds_at_Shark_River_Inlet.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Summer_in_Brigantine.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Terns_seen_in_my_trips.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Spring_Bird_Watching_at_Sandy_Hook.html


C8. Osprey

There are several osprey nests in Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) and in Sandy Hook in
New Jersey. So, we often see several ospreys in action in the spring season in this NWR and in Sandy Hook
either feeding their babies on the nests or going out to catch fish.

We also saw ospreys in action at Cape May Point State Park in New Jersey, Meadowlands Environmental
Park in New Jersey, Holmdel Park in New Jersey, Brick Township Reservoir in New Jersey, Conowingo Dam
on Susquehana River and Eastern Neck NWR in Maryland, Viera Wetlands in Florida, Yellowstone National
Park in Wyoming, US Glacier National Park in Montana, Florida, etc.

Photo and associated stories are on my web pages at:

http://
shltrip.com/Ospreys_in_Action.html

http://shltrip.com/Brick_and_Barnegat.html

http://shltrip.com/Autumn_Bird_Watching_in_Southern_New_Jersey.html

http://shltrip.com/Canadian_Rockies_4.html

http://shltrip.com/Shore_Areas_of_Belmar.html

http://shltrip.com/Spring_Bird_Watching_at_Sandy_Hook.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Florida_Merritt_Island.html


D. Watching Huge Number of Birds in Autumn Season

D1. Creamer's Field Migratory Waterfowl Refuge in Fairbanks, Alaska is Staging
Ground in August for Huge Number of Sandhill Cranes to Prepare for Their Autumn
Migration South

Each August as thousands of Sandhill Cranes (有丹頂的美洲鶴) begin their preparation for Autumn migration
from Alaska and Siberia southward to New Mexico, the Tanana Valley here in central Alaska rings with
gathering calls of sandhill cranes. These sand hill cranes have red crown. In the fall season, sand hill cranes
begin to group up in areas called staging ground. One of such staging ground is at Creamer's Field Migratory
Waterfowl Refuge in the heart of Fairbanks, Alaska where daily Sandhill Crane tallies regularly top 1,000. This
is the staging ground to prepare for their Autumn migration south through Platte River in Nebraska to reach
their wintering ground  at Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge in New Mexico, USA. The best time to
enjoy fall staging is late August and early September. Peak time is during the annual Sandhill Crane Festival
sponsored jointly by Friends of Creamer's Field, Arctic Audubon Society and the Alaska Bird Observatory.

In the morning of August 17, 2009, we drove from Healy to Fairbanks. Upon arrival at Fairbanks, the
first place that we visited was Creamer's Field Migratory Waterfowl Refuge to see huge number of
sand hill cranes here.

Creamer's Field Migratory Waterfowl Refuge is located at 1300 College Road, Fairbanks, AK 99701, two
miles from downtown Fairbanks. Phone: 907-452-5162.

Map:
Click here for interactive Google Map showing location of Creamer's Field Migratory Waterfowl Refuge

Photos and associated stories are on my web page at:

http://www.shltrip.com/Go_To_See_Alaska_Part_5_Richardson.html


D2. Jasper-Pulaski Fish and Wildlife Area in Indiana in Autumn Season is also a
Refueling Stop for Greater Sandhill Cranes

Jasper-Pulaski Fish and Wildlife Area in Indiana is used by the greater sandhill cranes as a refueling stop not
only in their spring migration north as described in Section C3, but also in autumn migration south. The
available information indicates that more than 30,000 Sandhill cranes have gathered there in early to mid
November during the peak of autumn migration south as shown in the following YouTube websites:

https://
www.youtube.com/watch?v=3lmFxUgt1-c

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kD3hJUye0mA


D3. Nature's Best Air Show and Bird Watchers' Paradise (賞鳥奇觀) at Bay of
Fundy in Eastern Canada in Autumn Season

The Bay of Fundy near New Brunswick and Nova Scotia in eastern Canada is one of several special bays in
the world that have very high vertical tidal range in the order of 50 feet or more, equivalent to the hight of a 5-
story building. As a reference, the global average tidal range is only 10 feet.

With 50-foot difference between high tide and low tide, very large areas of ocean floor of Bay of Fundy and its
associated river delta become exposed as huge mud flats during low tide. These exposed mud flats are
teeming with high density of tiny shrimp-like animals known as Fundy mud shrimp (about the size of a grain of
rice). There are as many as 20,000 - 60,000 of these Fundy mud shrimps per square metre! It is these plump,
squirming mud shrimp that attract millions of shorebirds to stop here during their autumn migratory season.
Each shorebird eats as many as 20,000 Fundy mud shrimps per day. The fantastic air show of shorebirds on
Bay of Fundy can be seen at the following YouTube movies:

https://
www.youtube.com/watch?v=I5YTmIiTHiY

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Rhg8QWELQw

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xyq1NkkCa98

More information on Bay of Fundy and Shorebirds are available on my web page at:

http:/
/www.shltrip.com/Nova_Scotia_and_New_Brunswick.html


D4. Wild Turkey

Many wild turkeys are thriving and roaming free in the hilly residential areas in San Francisco Bay Area in
California as shown on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Winter_Bird_Watching_in_East_Side_of_San_Francisco_Bay_Area.html
E. Good Locations in North America to Enjoy Watching Other Wildlife in Action

E1. Alligators - Hundreds of Them Sunbathing on Roadside

In Shark Valley Region of Everglades National Park in Florida, when the water temperature is too cold in
certain cold winter days, hundreds of adult and baby alligators leave the cold water and come up to enjoy  
sunbathing on the park roadside. We took the action-packed 2-hour Tram Tour ride narrated by a very
informative naturalist to enjoy watching hundreds of alligators on roadside, many kinds of birds and other
wildlife along the 15-mile paved loop road in the northern part known as the Shark Valley Region of Everglades
National Park in Florida.

Photos and associated stories are on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Florida_Everglades.html

We have also seen many alligators in Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, southern part of Everglade
National Park and Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park in Florida as shown in my web pages at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Florida_Merritt_Island.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Southern_Florida.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Florida_Homosassa.html

E2. Antelope (Pronghorn)

We saw many wild antelopes (Pronghorn) on the high plateau of San Augustin in New Mexico, in Custer State
Park in South Dakota, and in National Bison Range in Montana as shown in the following web pages:

http://
www.shltrip.com/New_Mexico_and_Texas.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Needles_Mountains.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Canadian_Rockies_2.html

We also saw some antelopes while we were driving on Highway 14 and Highway 12 near Bryce Canyon
National Park in Utah, and on several highways in Wyoming and North Dakota as shown on my web pages at:

http://www.shltrip.com/Moose_Wild_Horse-Wyoming.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Bryce_Canyon_and_Red_Canyon.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Zion_National_Parks_in_Utah.html

http://shltrip.com/Roosevelt_NP.html


E3. Bear

We saw several Grizzly bears and two baby bears while we were touring Denali National Park in Alaska as
shown on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Go_To_See_Alaska_Part_8_Denali.html

We also saw more bears while we were touring Alaska Wildlife Conservation Center at Milepost 79 of Seward
Highway in Alaska,  Mendenhall Glacier in Juneau, Alaska, near Lake Sherburne in Many Glacier Region of the
(US) Glacier National Park in Montana, Oxbow Bend Turnout in Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming, and
Crater Lake in southern Oregon as shown in my web pages at:


http://
www.shltrip.com/Go_To_See_Alaska_Part_11_Homer_to_Anchorage.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Go_To_See_Alaska_Part_2_Juneau.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Canadian_Rockies_3.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Grand_Teton_NP.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Crater_Lake_Volcanos.html


E4. Big Horn Sheep and Dall Sheep

We saw many wild big horn sheep in Hemenway Park in Boulder City and on the mountains along Lake Mead in
Nevada, in Glacier National Park in Montana, in Zion National Park in Utah, in Jasper National Park in Canadian
Rockies and in Badland National Park in South Dakota as shown in my web pages at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Lake_Mead.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Canadian_Rockies_4.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Zion_National_Parks_in_Utah.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Canadian_Rockies_1.html

http://shltrip.com/Badland_NP.html


We saw several Dall Sheep in Denali National Park in Alaska as shown in the following web page:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Go_To_See_Alaska_Part_8_Denali.html


E5. Bison (American Buffalo)

We saw many bison in Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming, Badland National Park and Custer State Park in
South Dakota, Theodore Roosevelt National Park in North Dakota, National Bison Range in Montana, Zion
National Park in Utah and Waterton Lakes National Park in southern Alberta, Canada as shown in my web
pages at:


http://
www.shltrip.com/Yellowstone_NP.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Badland_NP.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Needles_Mountains.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Canadian_Rockies_2.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Zion_National_Parks_in_Utah.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Canadian_Rockies_1.html


E6. Caribou

We saw a caribou with huge rack of antlers and several other caribous in Denali National Park as shown in the
following web page:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Go_To_See_Alaska_Part_8_Denali.html

We also saw caribou in the Large Animal Research Station of the University of Alaska in Fairbanks and Alaska
Wildlife Conservation Center at Milepost 79 of Seward Highway in Alaska, and in Newfoundland, Canada as
shown in the following web pages:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Go_To_See_Alaska_Part_5_Richardson.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Go_To_See_Alaska_Part_11_Homer_to_Anchorage.html

http://shltrip.com/Gros_Morne_NP.html


E7. Deer

Winter is the mating season for whitetail deer. Hundreds of wild whitetail deer meet up and form very large
herd. From November 2008 to February 2009, I visited Dorbrook Recreational Area near the junction of Route
537 and Laird Road in Colts Neck, New Jersey several times and often saw such large herd of whitetail deer in
action as shown by photos and movie clips on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Large_Herd_of_deer_in_Colts_Neck.html


E8. Dolphin

We saw hundreds of very playful dolphins at close distance in a one-and-half-hour boat tour from Port Aransas
in Texas as shown on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Many_Beautiful_Roseate_Spoonbills.html



E9. Elephant Seal

In the winter season from December to March, thousands of elephant seals (海象) come on the 6 miles of
beach as their breeding rookery just off California Highway 1.  The Piedras Blancas elephant seal rookery
spreads over 6 miles of shoreline around Point Piedras Blancas on the central coast of California.

The male adult elephant seals (海象) grow to as much as 5,000 lbs and 16 ft long. The females grow to as
much as 1,800 lbs and 12 ft.

There are parking lots and fenced boardwalks along Highway 1 for many visitors to enjoy watching thousands
of giant elephant seals and their 300-lb babies in action on the beach.

Photos, video and associated stories are on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Elephant_Seals_in_Caloifornia.html

Two more locations to see many elephant seals on the beach in California in winter season are:

(E9A). Chimney Rock area and Drake Beach area in Point Reyes National Seashore at 1 Drakes Beach Rd,
Inverness, CA 94937. It is located approximately 30 miles north of San Francisco on Highway 1 along the west
coast of California. Due to the high volume of traffic out to the Lighthouse and Chimney Rock areas during the
elephant seal pupping and mating season, the park will be operating a shuttle bus system from the Drakes
Beach parking lot (usually from New Year's to Easter each year on weekends and holidays--weather
permitting). Sir Francis Drake Boulevard from South Beach to the Lighthouse and Chimney Rock areas WILL
BE CLOSED during shuttle operating hours. On weekend and holidays with large number of visitors, visitors
need to buy ticket for shuttle bus and get on shuttle bus to go to Chimney Rock area to see elephant seals.

(E9B). Año Nuevo State Reserve State Park at 1 New Years Creek Rd, Pescadero, CA 94060, near Highway
1. It is about 60 miles south of San Francisco and 20 miles north of Santa Cruz. You must be on a guided walk
to view elephant seals during the winter season. A reservation ahead of time is required.


E10. Elk

We saw many elks in Point Reyes National Seashore in California, Waterton Lakes National Park, Kootenay
National Park and Banff National Park in Canada, Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming, National Bison Range
in Montana, Grand Canyon Village, Denali National Park in Alaska, Alaska Wildlife Conservation Center, Elk
Meadow located at the junction of US-101 (i.e., Redwood Hwy) and Davidson Road, Orick, and near Elk
Prairie Campground in northern California.  Photos and associated stories are on my web pages at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/More_Than_400_Wild_Elks.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Canadian_Rockies_1.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Yellowstone_NP.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Yellowstone_NP_Part_2.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Canadian_Rockies_2.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Canadian_Rockies_3.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Canadian_Rockies_4.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Grand_Canyon_South_Rim.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Go_To_See_Alaska_Part_11_Homer_to_Anchorage.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Go_To_See_Alaska_Part_8_Denali.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Northern_California_and_4.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Northern_California_Tour_2016.html


E11. Horseshoe Crab

Between about mid May to the first week of June every year, huge number of horseshoe crabs come up on
the beaches along Delaware Bay (between Delaware and New Jersey, USA) to mate and to lay eggs under
the sand.

Millions of migratory shorebirds have been migrating between southern tip of Argentina and the arctic tundra
breeding ground in Alaska during change of Season. The Delaware Bay (including southern seashore of New
Jersey) is one of the  important re-fueling stops of these millions of migratory shorebirds in their long-distance
migratory flight.

After 4-day nonstop long distance flight from South America, the migratory shorebirds lost a lot of body
weight and are starving when they arrive at Delaware Bay. These migratory shorebirds stop in the Delaware
Bay to eat a lot of eggs of horseshoe crabs to double their body weights in about two weeks for two
important reasons: (1) for their next nonstop long-distance flight from Delaware Bay to Alaska, and (2) They
must breed immediately upon their arrival at arctic tundra breeding ground in Alaska so that their baby birds
will have enough time to grow up and be ready for the long-distance migratory flight south before the severe
arctic winter sets in. While at Delaware Bay, these shorebirds eat about 9,000 horseshoe crab eggs per bird
per day.

The spring mating of large number of horseshoe crabs on the beaches in Delaware Bay and the associated
spring migration of millions of shorebirds through Delaware Bay is one of the world’s most magnificent wildlife
spectacles. The Bays’ beaches are essential spawning habitat for the world’s largest concentration of
horseshoe crabs. The beaches also attract the Western Hemisphere’s second-largest spring concentration of
shorebirds, which feed on the eggs of horseshoe crabs as shown in the following YouTube website:

https://
www.youtube.com/watch?v=wWb3ma3xaBE

The huge number of horseshoe crab eggs also attracts many laughing gulls to converge along the Reeds Beach
in New Jersey and the Pickering Beach on Delaware side competing for the annual feast on the eggs of
horseshoe crabs. These gulls are called “laughing gulls” because they make a lot of very loud noises that sound
like they are laughing very loudly. These laughing gulls are especially noisy on such beaches because they are
fighting against each other for the prime real estate on the beach front so that they can feast on the horseshoe
crab eggs.

Photos, video clips and associated stories are on my web pages at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Horseshoe_Crab.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Spring_Bird_Watching_along_Delaware_Bay.html




E12. Manatee

Blue Spring State Park in Florida is the winter home to hundreds of manatees (also known as sea cows). When
the weather and the water are warm, most manatees go into and spread out in the St. Johns River to feed. But
on cold days when the water in St. Johns River is too cold for manatees, hundreds of manatees come to Blue
Spring Run because temperatures in the Blue Spring run remain at constant 72 degrees year round, creating a
warm safe haven for the Manatees in cold winter. Manatees cannot survive below 15°C (60°F).

We came to Blue Spring State Park on a cold day in January 2014 mainly to enjoy watching hundreds of
manatees  in crystal clear water of beautiful Blue Spring Run. It is located at 2100 West French Avenue,
Orange City, Florida 32763.

Photos and associated stories are on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Florida_Blue_Spring.html


E13. Monarch Butterfly

Every winter, huge number of beautiful Monarch butterflies come to winter by clustering on the branches of
eucalyptus (尤加利 樹) grove or pine grove in California central coast. The orange-and-black monarch
butterflies are considered the “king” of the butterflies, hence the name “monarch”.

Two of such wintering places for Monarch butterflies along California coast are

(E12A) The Lighthouse Field State Beach Park in Santa Cruz. This park is located at the junction of Pelton Ave.
& W. Cliff Dr., Santa Cruz, California, and

(E12B) Monarch Grove Sanctuary located at 250 Ridge Rd, Pacific Grove, California 93950.

Photos, video and associated stories are on my web pages at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Monarch_Butterflies_in_Santa_Cruz.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Sand_Hill_Cranes_and_Monarch_Butterflies_in_California.html


E.14. Mountain Goat

We saw mountain goats near Logan Pass in US Glacier National Park in Montana as shown on my web page
at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Canadian_Rockies_2.html

We also see hundreds of goats being used as natural lawn mower in California as shown on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Natural_Lawnmower_in_California.html

E15. Moose

On September 2, 2008, we saw a bull moose with a huge rack of big antlers that have many spikes at Burgess
Junction in Wyoming as shown on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Moose_Wild_Horse-Wyoming.html

We drove up the winding Big Horn Scenic Byway (Highway 14) on the Big Horn Mountains in north-central
Wyoming and when we were reaching, Burgess Junction,  the highest level of the Big Horn Scenic Byway at
about 9,300 feet of elevation where we saw this bull moose. Tourists may see moose, deer and elk on a
regular basis in the Burgess Junction area. The Big Horn Scenic Byway (Highway 14) and Medicine Wheel
Passage (Highway 14A) merge at Burgess Junction.

Map:
Click here to see Google Map showing location of Burgess Junction

A bull moose may stand over 6 feet tall at the shoulder, can weigh up to 1,400 pounds and is a big and
powerful animal.

We also saw a bull moose in Alaska Wildlife Conservation Center at Milepost 79 of Seward Highway in Alaska
as shown on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Go_To_See_Alaska_Part_11_Homer_to_Anchorage.html

We also saw moose on several occasions during our tours in Denali National park and during our driving tours  
along other highways in Alaska, in Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming, in Newfoundland, Canada and in
Kootenai National Wildlife Refuge in northern Idaho as shown on my web pages at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Go_To_See_Alaska_Part_8_Denali.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Go_To_See_Alaska_Part_5_Richardson.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Go_To_See_Alaska_Part_6_Wrangell.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Grand_Teton_NP.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Gros_Morne_NP.html

http://shltrip.com/Canadian_Rockies_5.html

For my 2005 tour of Newfoundland in eastern Canada, when I was making hotel reservation in rural area in
Newfoundland, the hotel keeper told me to arrive at the hotel before sunset and not to drive at night in rural
areas in Newfoundland because there are many wild moose roaming free in Newfoundland. Many of these wild
moose come on the road at night. It is dangerous to drive at night in rural areas in Newfoundland because the
moose is so big.


E16. Musk Ox

We saw Musk Ox in Alaska Wildlife Conservation Center at Milepost 79 of Seward Highway in Alaska as
shown on the following web page:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Go_To_See_Alaska_Part_11_Homer_to_Anchorage.html

We also saw Musk Ox in the Large Animal Research Station of the University of Alaska in Fairbanks as shown
in the following web page:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Go_To_See_Alaska_Part_5_Richardson.html


E17. Salmon

We saw many salmon, especially red salmon,  swimming in various rivers, streams and creeks in Vancouver
Island, British Columbia in Canada, in Alaska and Atlantic salmon in Newfoundland as shown in my web pages
at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Salmons_on_Vancouver_Island.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Go_To_See_Alaska_Part_2_Juneau.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Go_To_See_Alaska_Part_3_Skagwayu.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Go_To_See_Alaska_Part_6_Wrangell.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Go_To_See_Alaska_Part_9_Ketchikan.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Go_To_See_Alaska_Part_10_Kenai_peninsula.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Birds_Islands_Newfoundland.html


E18. Sea Lion

At Simpson Reef Overlook along Oregon Coast, visitors can see thousands of marine mammals such as Steller
sea lions (weigh 2,000 pound), California sea lions (weigh 800 pound), elephant seals (weight 5,000 pound),
and harbor seals haul out on the Shell Island and reefs on the coast between Shore Acres State Park and
Cape Arago State Park. These are part of Oregon Islands National Wildlife Refuge. Visitors can hear the loud
barking ,of sea lions miles away from the Simpson Reef Overlook.

Photos and associated stories are on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Northern_California_and_Oregon-3.html

Sea Lion Caves located at 91560 U.S. 101, Florence, Oregon 97439 are a connected system of sea caves and
caverns open to the Pacific Ocean. It is 11 miles north of Florence on the beautiful and rugged Oregon Coast.
Sea Lion Caves is America's largest sea cave. The cave soars to the height of a 12-story building and
stretches the length of a football field. It is the natural home to a colony of sea lions and a diverse array of
other marine life and shore creatures. Stellar sea lions gather in this natural amphitheater, usually during fall
and winter. In the spring and summer, they breed and have their young on rock ledges just outside the cave.

Photos and associated stories are on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Oregon_Tour_2016.html

Many sea lions can also be seen in the bay near Municipal Wharf in Santa Cruz, near the rocks along the
famous 17-mile Scenic Drive in Pacific Grove, in the harbor of and Castle Rock National Wildlife Refuge near
Crescent City, in northwest California, and near Redondo Beach Pier in Los Angeles, California. Photos and
associated stories are on my web pages at:

http:/
/www.shltrip.com/California_Coast.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Northern_California_Tour_2016.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Los_Angeles.html

In the boat tour of Kenai Fjords National Park in Alaska, we saw many sea lions sun bathing on rocks as shown
on my web page at:

http:/
/www.shltrip.com/Go_To_See_Alaska_Part_7_Kenai.html



E19. Seals

When we were on Sapphire Princess cruise ship cruising the College Fjord to see many glaciers in Alaska, we
saw many harbor seals on an iceberg as shown on my web page at:

http://
shltrip.com/Go_To_See_Alaska_Part_4_College_Fjord.html

We have also seen many seals on seal rocks along California coast and in Elkhorn Slough in Monterey as
shown on my web page at:

http://
shltrip.com/California_Coast.html

We saw some seals in Kenai Fjords National Park, California

http://
www.shltrip.com/Go_To_See_Alaska_Part_7_Kenai.html

In winter season, many seals are enjoying sunbathing on the sand bars in Sandy Hook Bay in New Jersey as
shown on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Winter_at_Sandy_Hook.html


E20. Sea Otter and River Otter

We saw a group of sea otters floating leisurely in Elkhorn Slough in Monterey, California as shown on my web
page at:

http://
shltrip.com/California_Coast.html

We saw several playful river otters in Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park in Florida as shown on my web
page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Florida_Homosassa.html


E 21. Whale Watching from Shore (Not on a Boat)

We enjoyed whale watching from shore (not on a boat) at several locations along Oregon coast and along  
California coast near Crescent City as shown on my web pages at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Oregon_Tour_2016.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Northern_California_Tour_2016.html

We were lucky to see these "resident" whales near Oregon coast and northern California coast during the
summer season.


Whale Watching at Golden Gate Strait near San Francisco

In the summer season in recent couple years of 2016 and 2017, many humpback whales are showing up in the
Golden Gate Strait or even into San Francisco Bay. These humpback whales are following prey, primarily a
large school of anchovies or sardines or plankton that they love to eat. These whales are coming in for a
purpose and that is feeding. People with good scope can see the anchovies jumping out of the way.

With the protection of endangered species, may be the population of humpback whale is growing well and they
need to find new summer feeding opportunities.

There are several good locations in San Francisco Bay area for people to enjoy whale watching.

From Golden Gate Bridge:

The following three YouTube movies show whale watching from Golden Gate Bridge:

https://
www.youtube.com/watch?v=IlitvHhRwcM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0l4JH5xRrHw

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7iQI59P7jZY

The third movie shows that many birds are following the whale to catch small fish near the surface.

From Point Bonita Lighthouse in Marin Headland:

The following two YouTube movies show whale watching from Point Bonita Lighthouse which is on north side of
Golden Gate Strait:

https://
www.youtube.com/watch?v=464FHMqgpls

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wDfVRsI5Lts

From Lands End in San Francisco:

The following photos taken by my friend, Peter Chiang, show whale watching from Lands End which is on the
south side of Golden Gate Strait and is at northwest corner of San Francisco:

https://
photos.app.goo.gl/C8Q3Xa6m4RRdm3Ji2

So, people in San Francisco Bay area have one more hobby to enjoy, that is whale watching from the shore
(not on a boat.)



But there are more than 20,000 gray whales migrating south along west coast of North America from cold
arctic waters of the Bering Sea in Alaska going south to the warm water of Baja California in the winter season.
The baby gray whales are born in the warm water of Baja California in the winter season.

Then in the spring season, these 20,000 gray whales migrate north along west coast of North America to their
summer feeding grounds in the Bering Sea of Alaska.

The spring migration (March to May) is the best for whale watching from the shore, partly because the weather
is better, but mostly because the migrating mother gray whales come closer in towards the shore so their
babies are better protected to avoid being attacked and eaten by a pack of killer whales or by great white
sharks. Pods of gray whales also often nestle in the tame coves to feed their young and rest. For example, the
Mendocino Whale Festival, which is usually the first weekend in March, and the Fort Bragg Whale Festival, held
in mid-March.

A long list of good locations along west coast of North America, including California, Oregon and Washington
State, for whale watching from shore can be seen at:

http://
whaleaware.org/index.php?page=whale-watching-from-land


We also saw several whales from the look-out point in Gaspe Bay located at L'Anse-Aux-AMERINDIENS near
the eastern end of the park road along the southern shore of Forillon National Park in eastern Canada as
shown on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Forillon_NP.html

A Canadian visitor told us that he saw 60 whales from this look-out point the night before.

In addition to whale watching from shore, we had also seen whales from tour boats or cruise ship on several
occasions as shown on my web pages at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Bonaventure_Island_NP.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Birds_Islands_Newfoundland.html

http://shltrip.com/Go_To_See_Alaska_Part_7_Kenai.html

http://shltrip.com/Go_To_See_Alaska_Part_2_Juneau.html


E 22. Wild Horse

We saw many wild horses (mustang) far away on the wide open sagebrush flat on north side of Scenic
Highway 14 between Cody and Greybull in Wyoming as shown on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Moose_Wild_Horse-Wyoming.html

We also saw some wild horses in Theodore Roosevelt National Park in North Dakota as shown on my web
page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Roosevelt_NP.html

We also saw wild horses on the huge prairie  in Paynes Prairie Preserve State Park in Florida as shown on my
web page at:

http://shltrip.com/Florida_Paynes_Prairie.html

We also saw some wild horses in Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge in Virginia.


E23. Wild Pigs

While hiking in the desert in Guadalupe Mountains National Park in Texas near the border of New Mexico and
watching birds, we had a surprising encounter with several wild pigs known as Javelina as shown on my web
page at:

http://shltrip.com/New_Mexico_and_Texas.html

We also saw a wild pig on the huge prairie  in Paynes Prairie Preserve State Park in Florida as shown on my
web page at:

http://shltrip.com/Florida_Paynes_Prairie.html

We saw some wild pigs on the far side of the Upper Myakka Lake in Myakka River State Park in Florida as
shown on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Florida_Myakka.html


F. Good Locations in North America to Enjoy Watching Special Events

F1. Spectacular Air Show of Blue Angel Jets

On January 14, 2014, we were touring beautiful and pristine Gulf Islands National Seashore near Pensacola
Bay in northwest Florida. We were surprised to see the spectacular air show of Blue Angel Jets in the sky. The
air show lasted for more than one hour. What a surprising treat for us! It turns out that Pensacola is the home
of the renowned Blue Angels based at the Pensacola Naval Air Station. So, there are more opportunities to see
either official Blue Angel Air Show or Practice Run of Blue Angel Jets in this area. My photos, movie and
associated in formation are on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Florida_Gulf_Islands.html

More information about Blue Angel Jets, Pensacola Naval Air Station and air show schedule are available at the
following websites:

https://
www.visitpensacola.com/events/signature-events/blue-angel-air-show/

http://www.navalaviationmuseum.org/attractions/blue-angels/

http://wkrg.com/2017/06/20/details-released-on-blue-angels-pensacola-beach-show/


F2. Huge Farms of Solar Power Panels

F2A.  Ivanpah 392 MegaWatts Solar-Thermal Power Plant

When people drive on Interstate Highway I-15 between Las Vegas in Nevada and Los Angeles, California,
people can see the huge farm of  173,500 sun-tracking mirrors that focus solar energy on brightly shinning
boilers on the tops of three towers of the massive Ivanpath solar-Thermal Power Plant. It is in Mojave Desert
between Primm, Nevada and Nipton, California near Ivanpah, California. This solar power plant has a gross
capacity of 392 megawatts (MW). The 173,500 sun-tracking mirrors on the ground of the Ivanpah Solar
Electric Generating System sprawl across roughly 5 square miles of federal land near the California-Nevada
border. Each mirror is about the size of a garage door. Photos and associated stories are on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Solar_Power_and_Wind_Turbines.html

F2B. Solar Star 579 MegaWatts Photovoltaic Power Plant

The 579 MegaWatts Solar Star Photovoltaic (PV) Power Plant is slightly west of Rosamond in Antelope Valley,
California. When completed in June 2015, it was the world's largest farm of PV solar panels using 1.7 million
PV solar panels, made by SunPower and spread over 13 square kilometers (3,200 acres). The system
positions the solar panels to track the sun during the day, increasing energy capture by up to 25 percent. Aerial
views of Solar Star Photovoltaic Power Plant can be seen at:

http://
www.total.com/en/energy-expertise/projects/solar-power/solar-star-giant-photovoltaic-power-plant

https://www.mortenson.com/solar/projects/solar-star-i-and-ii

http://www.energy.ca.gov/tour/solarstar/

My photos and associated stories are on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Solar_Power_and_Wind_Turbines.html


F3. Huge Forests of Giant Wind Turbines

F3A.  Tehachapi 3,236 MegaWatts Huge Farm of 4,731 Wind Turbines

The 4,731 wind turbines are on Tehachapi Pass on the scenic Tehachapi Mountains in Mojave
Desert in southern California. It is near the junction of Highway 58 and Tehachapi Willow Springs Rd east of
the town of Tehachapi and is about five miles West of town of Mojave which is at the junction of Highway 58
and Highway 14. The Tehachapi Pass is one of the windiest areas in the world. This huge farm of wind
turbines  produce about 3,236 megawatts of electricity.  An aerial views of this large windmills farm can be
seen at the following website:

http://
clui.org/ludb/site/tehachapi-wind-farm


http://www.markholtzman.com/Energy/Wind/Alta-Wind-Energy-Center/i-9kBBckW


http://www.markholtzman.com/Energy/Wind/Alta-Wind-Energy-Center/i-C3CsJQT

It just went on and on for miles and miles of seeing the huge array of wind turbines on Mojave Desert when
we drove on Highway 14 and on Highway 58 in that area. My photos and associated stories are on my web
page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Solar_Power_and_Wind_Turbines.html


F3B. San Gorgonio Pass 615 MegaWatts Huge Forest of 3,218 Wind Turbines

The San Gorgonio Pass Wind Farm is located on the eastern slope of the San Gorgonio Pass in Riverside
County, just east of White Water,  and near Palm Springs in southern California. People driving on Interstate
Highway I-10 or on Highway 62 near Palm Springs can see this huge wind farm. My photos and associated
stories are on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Solar_Power_and_Wind_Turbines.html


F4. Hot Air Balloon Festival

The annual 3-day hot air balloon festival in New Jersey took place at Solberg Airport at Readington in New
Jersey from July 25 to 27, 2014. The address is 39 Thor Solberg Rd., Whitehouse Station, New Jersey
08889, Phone: 800-468-2479. It is about 4 miles west of Bridgewater/Somerville. The official name of this
annual festival is "Quick Chek New Jersey Festival of Ballooning" with its website at:

http://
www.balloonfestival.com/

Map: Click here for interactive Google Map showing location of this balloon festival

Balloons are the main event, however they have tons of events throughout the day. There are games, carnival
rides, pony ride, Fun Slide, the concert, fireworks, Night Magic Glow and good carnival food such as grilled
sausages and fried Oreos. Also tons of vendors giving out free snacks and even ice cream. The sight of those
giant balloons in the air lit from within at night like giant holiday ornaments is breathtaking. The hot air balloon
festival attracts more than 175,000 people from all over the United States, and is the premiere family
entertainment attraction in New Jersey

My photos and associated stories are on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Hot_Air_Balloon_Festival.html


F5. Christmas Light Show

During the Christmas-New Year Holiday season,  the Sleepy Hollow Christmas Lights Extravaganza in the
community of Seaside in Los Angeles, California is fantastic. This large area of several streets and several
blocks is covered with the mature Chinese Elm trees that stretch and arch almost all the way
across the streets. Virtually all residents in that community decorate their houses and trees with lights extending
up to the branches, so when you're walking or driving slowly through, it's as if you are passing through tunnels
of lights. TONS of lights with spectacular displays. It's so pretty! This is one of those places that really gets you
into the Christmas spirit. It was a wonderful way to spend a holiday night in Los Angeles. My photos and
associated stories are on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Los_Angeles.html



G. List, Index and Three Search Methods for more than 250 web pages on my
Travelogue Website (老林遊記)

After seeing my Travelogue (老林遊記) web pages from time to time for several years, some friends
occasionally ask me if I have a list or an index for all my web pages.

The answer is Yes.

There is a long list of titles of more than 250 of my web pages, listed according to alphabetic order, on the
home page of my Travelogue website (老林遊記) at:

www.shltrip.com

(Note: shl are the initials of my name Sing H. Lin. So, shltrip means my trips, 老林遊記.)

The title of each web page on this long list is "hot" in the sense that if you click on the title, it opens up the
particular web page of interest to you.

Furthermore, on each of my Travel web page, there is a highlighted Word of “Home” at the upper left corner of
the web page and a rectangular box at the end of the web page. The rectangular box at the end is labeled as
“Click here for Home Page to see List (Index) of All My Trips with Links to Their Web Pages.” If you click on
either the highlighted word “Home” at the beginning or the rectangular box at the end of each of my web page,
the Home Page of my Travelogue website will open up for you to use.

The beginning of the Home Page also describes three methods that you can use to search my Travelogue
website to find particular web pages of interest to you.