Death Valley National Park
Two views at the Zabriskie Point off Highway 190 in Death Valley National Park in eastern California.

Map: Click here to see a detailed map of Death Valley National Park
Devil's Golf Course as viewed from Badwater Road in Death Valley
Twenty-Mule-Team Borax Trail accessed from Highway 190 in Death Valley
Huge Salt Pan on the floor in Death Valley as viewed from the Dante's Point.
Multi-Colored Rocks at Artists Palette on Artists Drive off Badwater Road in Death Valley
Zoom in on the Sand Dunes in Death Valley as viewed from Highway 190 near Stovepipe Wells Village.
A picture of me (Sing Lin) at Ubehebe (Volcanic) Crater at north end of Death Valley in my April 2003 trip.
A views in southern part of Death Valley.
Another view of Death Valley from Dante's Point in Death Valley

Map: Click here to see Google Map showing location of Death Valley
Scotty Castle in northern part of Death Valley. There is a good sized spring here supplying water for this castle
in the desert.
Huge area of Salt Pan on the floor as viewed from Badwater Road  in Death Valley
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At elevation of 282 ft (85 m) below sea level, Badwater Basin in Death Valley is the official lowest (in
elevation) point in North America.  On the other hand, at elevation of 14, 495 feet, Mt. Whitney is the highest
peak in the contiguous (lower 48 states in) United States. It is interesting to note that the lowest place in
North America—Badwater—and the highest spot in the lower 48 states—Mt. Whitney—are only 76 miles
apart in eastern California. Lone Pine on Scenic Byway 395 is a popular gateway for many tourists to access
both the highest Peak, Mt. Whitney, and the lowest point, Death Valley National Park.

Therefore, in our tour of Eastern Sierra in April 2012, we also toured the nearby Death Valley National Park.
This is our second tour of Death Valley National Park. Our first time of touring Death Valley National Park
was in April 2003. I combined the photos of Death Valley National Park from the 2003 trip and the 2012 trip
in this web page.

Map: Click here to see a map showing location of Death Valley National Park relative to U S 395 in Eastern
Sierra
Entrance to the Golden Canyon as viewed from Badwater Road in Death Valley
Scenery near Golden Canyon in Death Valley
One of several fantastic views along Highway 190 going from Furnace Creek Visitor Center to Death Valley
Junction.
In our April 2003 trip, we did stay one night in a motel in the Death Valley National Park. Wow! We enjoyed
watching sky full of stars (
滿天星斗, 當夜晚繁星佈滿整個天空,彷彿伸手就能摘到星星。) during that night in
Death Valley. The air was bone dry. For many years, I have not seen such open panoramic view of the whole
sky of bright stars without interference from man-made light pollution and obstructions by trees and buildings.

My reports on more interesting features of Mojave Desert are at the following two Travelogue web pages:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Rainbow_Basin.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Rim_of_the_World.html



Part 1 and Part 2 of my tour of Eastern Sierra in 2012 associated with this tour of Death Valley National Park
are at the following two Travelogue web pages:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Spectacular_Eastern_Sierra_Part_1.html

http://www.shltrip.com/Spectacular_Eastern_Sierra_Part_2.html
Large pumice bed where almost nothing can grow on the floor of Death Valley.
Magnificent view at sunset time along  scenic Highway 374 (Daylight Pass Road) between Hell's Gate in Death
Valley and Beatty in Nevada.
From Death Valley National Park we drove along Highway 190 east to Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge
(NWR) in Nevada. The South Entrance of Ash Meadows NWR is at Junction of Bell Vista Rd. & Ash Meadows
Rd. (i.e., Spring Meadows Rd.) in Pahrump, NV, Phone: (775) 372-5435

Map: Click here for a map showing location of Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge

Map: Click here for detailed map of Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge including Devils Hole
Then we drove on unpaved dirt road in Ash Meadows NWR to reach Devils Hole which is part of Death Valley
National Park even though Devils Hole is in Ash Meadows NWR in Nevada and is physically separated from
Death Valley.
Devils Hole in a protected fenced-in area. It is a collapsed roof of an arm of an underground lake. It is the only
natural habitat of the Devils Hole pupfish, which thrives in such hot water.

See the following YouTube movie on the big waves in this underground lake caused by an earthquake
thousands of miles away:

http://
www.youtube.com/watch?v=a6h82PIi_-0&feature=email

We also saw some waterfowl in Crystal Reservoir. However, it was at sunset time such that we did not have
much time to explore Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge.
A view along Highway 190 in Death Valley National Park.
四處戈壁荒漠,頑強挺立於茫茫荒漠中,不隨季節而變,那說不盡的蒼茫,格調深沉的
蒼茫之美。

Trona Pinnacles National Natural Landmark is one of the most unusual geological features in the California
Desert National Conservation Area. The unusual landscape consists of more than 500 tufa spires on the dry
lake bed of Searles Lake in Searles Valley.  Some as high as 140 feet (43 m). The pinnacles vary in size and
shape from short and squat to tall and thin, and are composed primarily of calcium carbonate (tufa). It is about
15 miles southwest of Death Valley National Park. Therefore, we also toured Trona Pinnacles in this trip in
2012.

It seems that the mechanism for the formation of these Trona Pinnacles is the same as that of Tufa Towers
on Mono Lake as described on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Spectacular_Eastern_Sierra_Part_2.html

In ancient time, the Searles Lake here was full of water as a huge lake. Before 1941, the water level in Mono
Lake was also much higher. The Trona Pinnacles and the Tufa towers were all formed under water. Typically,
underwater hot springs rich in super-saturated calcium  mix with cool lake water rich in carbonates (the stuff in
baking soda). As the calcium comes in contact with carbonates in the lake, a chemical reaction occurs
resulting in calcium carbonate -- limestone. The calcium carbonate precipitates (settles out of solution as a
solid) around the underwater hot spring, and over the course of decades to centuries, a Tufa tower will grow.
As the water in the Searles Lake evaporated away over the long geological time, the underwater Tufa towers
become the Trona Pinnacles standing on the dry lake bed.
Map: Click here for an interactive Google Map showing location of Trona Pinnacles in eastern California

plus the route and directions to go from the town of Ridgecrest to Trona Pinnacles:
1.        From Ridgecrest, California travel 20 miles east on State Highway 178 to its intersection with
Trona-Red Mountain Road.
2.        Continue east on Highway 178 for 7.7 miles,
3.        Then turn south into Pinnacle Road (an unpaved  dirt road, RM 143) -- drive 5 more miles south on this
unpaved Pinnacles Road until you reach the pinnacles.

Warning: The unpaved dirt road is rough, and covered in sharp rocks that could do serious damage, stay out
of the sand washes. Quite a few cars have been stranded in the wide sand wash that divides the main
Pinnacles group. It is highly desirable to use 4X4 all wheel drive vehicle with high clearance.
A number of Hollywood films have been shot in the surrounding desert (particularly around the Trona
Pinnacles), including Star Trek V: The Final Frontier and Planet of the Apes.

The nearby little town, Trona, takes its name from the mineral trona, abundant in the lakebed of Searles Lake,
a dry lake bed in Searles Valley.
A mining company near the town of Trona is mining and processing the mineral trona from the dry lake bed of
Searles Lake.

We also saw a similar mining company  mining trona from the dry lake bed of Owens Lake in Owens Valley
near Lone Pine as described on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Spectacular_Eastern_Sierra_Part_1.html
Big pile of mined minerals at Trona.
Shape of a shark on the Panamint Mountain as viewed from Highway 178 when we were driving from Trona
Pinnacles to Highway 190 to go to Death Valley National Park
Another magnificent view at sunset time along  scenic Highway 374 (Daylight Pass Road) between Hell's Gate
in Death Valley and Beatty in Nevada.
A picture of me (Sing Lin) at the Visitor Center in my April 2003 Trip.
讀萬卷書    行萬里路

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How I use information age technologies to enhance my enjoyment greatly of sightseeing large driving tour
loop of thousands of miles and of one to two weeks in duration covering many Points of Interest is described
on my web page at:

http://
www.shltrip.com/Sightseeing_in_Information_Age.html